Boat Safety Equipment Checklist

Boat Safety Equipment you should keep onboard.

As a boat owner, it is ultimately your responsibility to ensure your vessel is always in serviceable condition and properly equipped with enough safety equipment to help prevent accidents and injuries. Luckily, there’s no shortage of items available on the market that are intended to help you achieve safety goals. Although it would be impossible to discuss every single one, we’ve compiled a safety equipment checklist to cover the basics you’ll need.

Navigation Lights

If you want to be in a frightening situation, simply be out on the ocean after nightfall with no lighting available. Even if the waters are completely calm, this can be a harrowing experience. Adding navigation lights will allow you to see in the dark, so you can find your way. Plus, others will be able to see you, which will further ensure your safety.

First Aid for Small Emergencies

Injuries are bound to happen, which is exactly why you should always be prepared for them. This is an easy item to add to your safety equipment checklist because there are marine-specific first aid kits available. This will allow you to deal with cuts, scrapes, and even mild illnesses.

Visual Signaling Devices

Having a visual distress signal isn’t just a good idea – it’s also a requirement. If your boat is shorter than 16 feet, you must have flares or nighttime signals. If it’s greater than 16 feet, you’re required to carry visual signals for both day and night. A few examples of these include flares and strobe lights, depending on the time of day.

Wearable Flotation Devices

It’s impossible to discuss boat safety equipment without referring to personal flotation devices. This is actually a requirement for any children 12 and under whenever your vessel is in motion. Plus, making sure that every person on board has a life jacket in case of an unfortunate incident is simply the sign of a responsible boat owner.

Throwable Flotation Devices

Another requirement for every boat is to have at least one throwable flotation device on board. This is typically referred to as a “lifesaver,” despite the fact that they come in a few different styles. The best ones are those that have a line attached to them, which will allow you to throw the device to someone and then pull them back to the boat.

Fire Extinguishers for Flame Control

You definitely don’t want to leave the shore without having a Coast Guard approved fire extinguisher on board. If your boat is shorter than 26 feet, you’re required to have at least one B-1 type extinguisher. If it’s between 26 and 40 feet, then you must have at least two B-1 type extinguisher or one B-2 type. Also, be sure that everyone on board knows how to use the hand-held fire extinguisher just in case.

Sound Signaling Devices

Having some type of horn or whistle on your boat is always a good idea, but it’s especially useful in fog and other situations where visibility might be an issue. These sound-producing devices will allow you to alert others of your position, which can help you avoid accidents when it’s difficult to see. If your vessel is larger than 39 feet, you should definitely consider the use of a bell that goes off at regular intervals.

Cellphone and UHF/VHF Radio

Being able to contact people is a necessity every time you go out on the water. In most cases, having a cellphone will be enough. However, you should also have a UHF/VHF radio on board so you’re always connected. Another option is to have a satellite phone, which enables you to stay in contact no matter where you are.

Manual Propelling Device

In this day and age of relying on technology, we often forget that manual devices are an excellent backup. You should have some type of manual propelling devices on board, such as oars or something similar. This will enable you to get your vessel moving in the event that its motor breaks down.

Contact Seaspension® to Learn More About Your Safety Equipment Checklist 

By following this safety equipment checklist, you’ll have several of the basics covered the next time you go out on the water with friends and family. You can also protect yourself by equipping your vessel with a Seaspension® shock-absorbing boat seat pedestal, which will alleviate the discomfort caused by the movement of the water. If you’d like to learn more about Seaspension® products or Parker Boats accessories, give our team a call at (727) 216-9639 today.

Boat Safety Equipment you should keep onboard.

As a boat owner, it is ultimately your responsibility to ensure your vessel is always in serviceable condition and properly equipped with enough safety equipment to help prevent accidents and injuries. Luckily, there’s no shortage of items available on the market that are intended to help you achieve safety goals. Although it would be impossible to discuss every single one, we’ve compiled a safety equipment checklist to cover the basics you’ll need.

Navigation Lights

If you want to be in a frightening situation, simply be out on the ocean after nightfall with no lighting available. Even if the waters are completely calm, this can be a harrowing experience. Adding navigation lights will allow you to see in the dark, so you can find your way. Plus, others will be able to see you, which will further ensure your safety.

First Aid for Small Emergencies

Injuries are bound to happen, which is exactly why you should always be prepared for them. This is an easy item to add to your safety equipment checklist because there are marine-specific first aid kits available. This will allow you to deal with cuts, scrapes, and even mild illnesses.

Visual Signaling Devices

Having a visual distress signal isn’t just a good idea – it’s also a requirement. If your boat is shorter than 16 feet, you must have flares or nighttime signals. If it’s greater than 16 feet, you’re required to carry visual signals for both day and night. A few examples of these include flares and strobe lights, depending on the time of day.

Wearable Flotation Devices

It’s impossible to discuss boat safety equipment without referring to personal flotation devices. This is actually a requirement for any children 12 and under whenever your vessel is in motion. Plus, making sure that every person on board has a life jacket in case of an unfortunate incident is simply the sign of a responsible boat owner.

Throwable Flotation Devices

Another requirement for every boat is to have at least one throwable flotation device on board. This is typically referred to as a “lifesaver,” despite the fact that they come in a few different styles. The best ones are those that have a line attached to them, which will allow you to throw the device to someone and then pull them back to the boat.

Fire Extinguishers for Flame Control

You definitely don’t want to leave the shore without having a Coast Guard approved fire extinguisher on board. If your boat is shorter than 26 feet, you’re required to have at least one B-1 type extinguisher. If it’s between 26 and 40 feet, then you must have at least two B-1 type extinguisher or one B-2 type. Also, be sure that everyone on board knows how to use the hand-held fire extinguisher just in case.

Sound Signaling Devices

Having some type of horn or whistle on your boat is always a good idea, but it’s especially useful in fog and other situations where visibility might be an issue. These sound-producing devices will allow you to alert others of your position, which can help you avoid accidents when it’s difficult to see. If your vessel is larger than 39 feet, you should definitely consider the use of a bell that goes off at regular intervals.

Cellphone and UHF/VHF Radio

Being able to contact people is a necessity every time you go out on the water. In most cases, having a cellphone will be enough. However, you should also have a UHF/VHF radio on board so you’re always connected. Another option is to have a satellite phone, which enables you to stay in contact no matter where you are.

Manual Propelling Device

In this day and age of relying on technology, we often forget that manual devices are an excellent backup. You should have some type of manual propelling devices on board, such as oars or something similar. This will enable you to get your vessel moving in the event that its motor breaks down.

Contact Seaspension® to Learn More About Your Safety Equipment Checklist 

By following this safety equipment checklist, you’ll have several of the basics covered the next time you go out on the water with friends and family. You can also protect yourself by equipping your vessel with a Seaspension® shock-absorbing boat seat pedestal, which will alleviate the discomfort caused by the movement of the water. If you’d like to learn more about Seaspension® products or Parker Boats accessories, give our team a call at (727) 216-9639 today.

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